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Version 2.2.2.post1701+g250c33e83
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matplotlib.pyplot.text

matplotlib.pyplot.text(x, y, s, fontdict=None, withdash=False, **kwargs)[source]

Add text to the axes.

Add the text s to the axes at location x, y in data coordinates.

Parameters:
x, y : scalars

The position to place the text. By default, this is in data coordinates. The coordinate system can be changed using the transform parameter.

s : str

The text.

fontdict : dictionary, optional, default: None

A dictionary to override the default text properties. If fontdict is None, the defaults are determined by your rc parameters.

withdash : boolean, optional, default: False

Creates a TextWithDash instance instead of a Text instance.

Returns:
text : Text

The created Text instance.

Other Parameters:
**kwargs : Text properties.

Other miscellaneous text parameters.

Examples

Individual keyword arguments can be used to override any given parameter:

>>> text(x, y, s, fontsize=12)

The default transform specifies that text is in data coords, alternatively, you can specify text in axis coords (0,0 is lower-left and 1,1 is upper-right). The example below places text in the center of the axes:

>>> text(0.5, 0.5, 'matplotlib', horizontalalignment='center',
...      verticalalignment='center', transform=ax.transAxes)

You can put a rectangular box around the text instance (e.g., to set a background color) by using the keyword bbox. bbox is a dictionary of Rectangle properties. For example:

>>> text(x, y, s, bbox=dict(facecolor='red', alpha=0.5))